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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  16:14:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hmm..if you want to do American history, I would suggest spending a day in Philadelphia. You could make it in a day trip. It was the first U.S. Capital. You can see the Liberty Bell or Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence was signed, and many other places. Definitly go to Niagra Falls. Also, a lot of people in New York City like to come see "Pennsylvania Dutch Country" but seeing Amish people doesn't excite me because it's nothing new. Atlantic City, NJ is an interesting place to visit. There is no place else like it. Go just for the experience.

How long are you staying in New York, Bee?


Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  16:35:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cool, thanks for the recommendations! I'm going to buy a guidebook and read up on those places. I'm on placement for six weeks, and will probably spend at least one extra week there.

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Purveyor of Fine Peebles
Haggy is (probably not) Cactus!
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Siobhan
Chief Healer

USA
2157 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  17:11:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm blad you've got a guide book. That should help you figure out what is doable in a day-trip. The one thing that visitors from Europe are first struck by is the sheer distance involved in traveling from one great place to another. Being in New York, and New England in general, things will be a bit closer to each other. But for me to get to Virginia is an 8+ hour drive on the interstate. Unless you have a whole weekend to play with, a lot of your visit can be taken up with travel.

Deliberatley causing mayhem in Snape's Potions class.
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  17:42:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In NYC: The museums are awesome. I love MOMA but the Metropolitan is a must. I spent a week in Mid-town did a bunch of touristy things: went to grand Grand Central Station, went to the top of the Rockefeller Plaza to see the view (recommended, it's awesome, especially at sunset), went to a broadway show (TKTS sells same-day tickets at a discount), walked up and down 5th Avenue (okay, so I didn't want to buy anything - sue me). There's a skating rink at the Rockefeller Center that turns into a bar/restaurant in the warmer months. Food's awful but the people-watching is great and from then on whenever the TV shows New York City and that gold statue of Prometheus you can think - Hey! I had a drink right there!

Surrounding areas - I totally second Boston, it's a one day drive and a very fun city - lots of Irish! Also Niagara Falls. I hear the Adirondacks are very beautiful.

The scenery in the east isn't as dramatic as the West but it's more picturesque - I highly recommend the Maine coast - it is lovely. And the lobster is great too.

I know Jo is selling her home state and I love Philadelphia but I think Philly is a harder city for visitors - I think it's not as tourist friendly as either DC or Boston.



And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.


Edited by - AMC on 03/09/2007 18:02:18
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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  18:25:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's funny; I was born in NYC but I probably know less about it than anyone here. The town and I never really got on. About the only thing I ever wanted to do when going to New York was visit FAO Schwarz (basically the American version of Hamleys) and the AT&T Infoquest Center (is that place still around? It was cool). It's a sign of how long its been since I was in NYC that I can't recommend any art galleries, although the American Museum of Natural History is probably better than the British one, which is saying something. There's a cafe in Grand Central that makes a great clam chowder (You must not visit the northeastern US without first learning the proper way to eat clam chowder- break the saltines before eating, then stir them in). The two smells I remember from childhood are mouldy carpet (from visiting ski lodges in Colorado) and creosote (because Grand Central Station reeks of it).

Order of the Bookmark

As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 03/09/2007 18:28:01
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  20:21:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Diri, the question is do you eat New England Clam Chowder or New York Clam Chowder? I don't like either type, but I do like corn chowder.

Saltines are crucial for soup, especially Beef Vegetable Soup (exception is Chicken Noodle Soup). Can't eat it unless it's full of crushed up saltine crackers. Hmmm, talk of crackers is making me hungry crackers and milk. Take some saltines and slightly crush them, pour with milk, and sprinkle sugar on top. The crackers soak up the milk and expand and just yummy with the sugar. Sounds disgusting, but delicious. You can substitute graham cracker for saltines if you want, or even toast is excellent.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 03/09/2007 20:24:23
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  20:22:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not anymore! They re-did Grand Central - it's bea-u-tiful! And there's a large indoor market where NYC commuters can buy beautiful food to take home to their CT suburban houses. It would almost make it worth while living in CT...

The Oyster Bar restaurant is still there, still the same - it's been there as long as Grand Central has. I ate dinner there and I might even have had their clam chowder - although I never touch the crackers, myself.



And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Emmmma
Barmy

293 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2007 :  22:37:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
It would almost make it worth while living in CT...




Formerly Garside! ;-)
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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2007 :  03:10:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Diri, the question is do you eat New England Clam Chowder or New York Clam Chowder?


New England. Manhattan clam chowder is just... wrong.

quote:
Not anymore! They re-did Grand Central - it's bea-u-tiful!


Are you saying that Grand Central doesn't smell of creosote anymore? That's an essential element of my childhood gone!

Order of the Bookmark

As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 03/10/2007 06:31:31
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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2007 :  06:11:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
CT?

Apparently you can get very good chowder over here, but I've never tried it because I don't think I'd like the texture. Maybe I'll try clam chowder when I'm in the States. I should start making a list of foods to try. So far, all I have on my list is Oreos.

Speaking of which, I've heard that fresh fruit and vegetables are really expensive over there and that it's much cheaper to eat junk. Is that about right? People always arrive home from America looking decidedly heftier than when they left. I have no willpower, so I'm doomed. Hell, I managed to gain a stone in Sri Lanka, and that's practically third world!

Order of the Bookmark
Purveyor of Fine Peebles
Haggy is (probably not) Cactus!
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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2007 :  06:33:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I assume CT means Connecticut

re: junk food; food over there is a bit cheaper than it is here (of course, from my perspective, "here" is London, so using dollar bills as kindling would be less expensive) but it tastes absolutely foul. American apples are big, red, luscious and perfect, but taste like sand. Cereals are all bright and colourful but taste sickly sweet and turn milk the colour of a bad bruise. Don't even go near the Cheez-Whiz. And stay away from the Cool Whip. And the Miracle Whip. In fact, anything with "whip" in the title. And don't even try drinking tea; even the PG Tips taste horrible over there.

On the other hand, Mallomars pretty much make up for everything else. And Pepperige Farm Goldfish crackers. And Crispix cereal. And Wheat Thins. Gotta love the Wheat Thins. And giant pretzels. With mustard. And there's nothing like a good New England lobster. And the portions. Wow. EVERYTHING is huge over there.

Order of the Bookmark

As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 03/10/2007 06:43:43
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Starling
Confunded

United Kingdom
701 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2007 :  12:11:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My brother was really, really skinny when he moved to Boston. When he came back he was so big, I didn't recognise him. He's been back for a while now, but he's still not managed to lose all the weight.

*writes "several boxes of Yogi tea" on list of what to take to the US*

Mmmmmmm, giant pretzels. Lobster. *dribbles*

I wuv multicoloured werewolf puppies.
"When Mister Safety Catch Is Not On, Mister Crossbow Is Not Your Friend."
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2007 :  21:35:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just bought about $400 worth of clothes at Macy's. But, I didn't pay that. I'm much too cheap and hate shopping but I hit a huge sale...50%-75% off on top of buy one, get one free. Then I had a coupon from the mail. I ended up paying under $50 for a huge bag full of clothes. They're getting rid of their winter stock, but it stays cold in PA for quite awhile and all of it's wearable into spring. Usually I feel guilty about shopping, but I'm just so proud of myself for the deals I got. Now I've just got to work up the energy to go jeans shopping.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2007 :  23:06:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You have to know where to buy tea in the US but I never have a problem finding decent tea. Not good tea - that's rough to find - but decent tea. And I have pretty high standards when it comes to tea.

Bee - You can go to TRADER JOES! The just opened one in Manhattan last year. That's my local store - everything gourmet on the cheap. Gotta love TJs. Also - Zabar's deli on the Upper West Side. Oh and New York bagels - they're the best. Most people like them with cream cheese but I like mine warm from the oven with butter. Yummm.. Although our butter isn't a patch on yours.

Yes, we're all fat in the US - portions are humongous and people finish them. Going out to dinner is absurd - they offer you appetizers (small dishes) while your main course - called the entrée here for reasons no one who speaks any French can understand - is being cooked. You finish the appetizers (and/or soup) and you're probably too full to eat dinner but they bring it anyway. And it's enough for two people. Along with it comes bread and butter.. and some side dishes.

Also - on the fruit and vege issue, I'd say the quality very much depends upon where you live and where you buy fruit but the pricing is accurate - it's much more expensive to buy fresh foods. Which is why poor people have an even worse problem with obesity than wealthier people. The cheapest dinner you can buy comes from McDonalds... and we all know about their food.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.


Edited by - AMC on 03/10/2007 23:16:53
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gimu
Addled

Ireland
209 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  11:12:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hi all,
just dropping in for a minute. Wow, so you are going to NY Bee. My poor other half went there recently and got food poisoning. He went with work and they took him out to this posh restaurant for a meal. He had something with those "shiitake" mushrooms in it. (I hope thats how its spelt- it is the name of the mushrooms though - can't help that) He said the name of the mushrooms made a whole lot of sense at 3am. Sorry bad joke I know, but it is kind of funny if it isn't you that's being sick. He also went to St.Louis for a month about a year ago and he put on about a stone. Although he did say he was impressed with the hotel where he stayed - they had a lovely fruit salad made up for breakfast every day.
One hint, bring your own teabags - I don't know if you are a tea person - I'm not particularly, but my other half can't go out of the british isles and not take tea with him. Good luck with the placement. Will you be there in July?
Have you all decided where you would like to read HPDH? I was thinking of not reading it at first, but buying the audiobook and listening to it instead - that way it would take longer and I could enjoy it for more time... I always skim read. I did read that the audiobook would be out the same day. I suppose that means Stephen Fry will be a hunted man for some time before - I assume he will make the audiobook a week or so before publication. Anyone know anymore?

Edited by - gimu on 03/11/2007 11:24:34
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  11:25:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HEY GIMU! Good to see you, now where's Strawberry?

LOL about shi-take mushrooms (Siobhan... this editor of yours! Poootake indeed)

Well I didn't get food poisoning in NYC - that can happen anywhere - however, there was just a huge to-do in the media about NYC restaurants and vermin infestations... yeeeeeeeew.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  11:42:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OOH -- I wanna go to Trader Joe's! I'll be in Columbus next weekend; it's on the list.

As to buying produce in the US, it's no different that being a good market shopper anywhere. You have to know what to buy and what to leave. Watch the sales and eat fresh food within a day or two of purchase (or a week for fruit). I don't have a problem finding good apples and fruit ... I just know what varieties I like (despite looks, Gala apples are sperior to Red Delicious, etc.), and I buy what looks best that day. Sometimes it's apples and navel oranges, other times it's bananas and pears. Same with veggies, just look them over well; what's good changes from day to day and month to month. Since you'll be here in the summer, Bee, you'll probably have a great selection of fresh food available (Tomatoes! Yum!). Even better if you stay through Autumn (Corn on the cob, squash, new potatoes, oh yeah!). Cook to the season, and your food will tase much better, and cost much less. Fresh is still pricier than canned, but don't skimp; you can always economize by filling in with rice or noodles on the side, which are darn cheap.

The best restaurant strategy I know is the TAKE HOME BOX (fka the doggy bag). Ask for one up front and put half your appetizer and meal into it before you even start to eat. Nick a roll or two also. You'll still have more than enough for supper, and easy dinner the next day too.

Things to definitely try over here:
California wines: Some are really good, and not that expensive!
Corn in season (late summer, fall)
American pizza: Abandon preconceptions because it's probably much different than what you're used to, but it's quite good in itself. Varies greatly from place to place.
Turkey! Trimmings! Have someone make you Thanksgiving dinner early. Wear stretchy pants. It's an American experience not to be missed.
Sweetened Iced Tea: You may love it or hate it, but you should at least try it.
Krispy Kremes: In moderation, of course. But try one fresh and warm.

Things to avoid, or at least approach with low expectations:
Cheese: (or anything dairy for that matter) ... Fattening and disappointing compared to cheese in other countries. But it's all pasteurized, homogenized, and safe, so there you have it. The milk is OK, though!
Beer: American beer is thin and yucky. It's OK ice cold on a very hot summer day, but keep in mind that it's a completely different experience than beer elsewhere.
Bread: (unless it's from a bakery) Again, fattening, boring and unsatisfying.
Beef: Plentiful and not-so-expensive, but bland. All the flavor has been bred out of it in favor of size, unless you specifically buy Angus or some very expensive cut. It's probably that way everywhere, though.
Krispy Kremes: In excess may lead to buxomatosis, buttsamatitis (a closely related condition), and dunlop's disease.

You'll have a blast! I'm so envious! (We need a green smiley here. )



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gimu
Addled

Ireland
209 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  11:54:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
oops,
Yes AMC- I was spelling the mushroom wrongly. Its Shiitake NOT Shi ttake - this is what the program does when I don't put the space in poootake - heehee
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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  13:20:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for all the advice on food! So many new things to try! I'll definitely take my own teabags though - I can't be doing without good tea.

Hi Gimu! Good to hear from you, and thanks for the heads up on shiitake mushrooms (whatever they are).

I remember being in New York when I was nine and feeling completely overwhelmed by the portions in restaurants. The take home box thing sounds like an excellent idea. I'm a grazer anyway - I get hungry regularly but can only eat small amounts in one sitting.

Trader Joe's... *makes mental note*

Order of the Bookmark
Purveyor of Fine Peebles
Haggy is (probably not) Cactus!
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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  13:35:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Krispy Kremes: In excess may lead to buxomatosis, buttsamatitis (a closely related condition), and dunlop's disease.


Krispy Kremes make my teeth hurt.

Yeah, where is Strawbs? I saw her in Bath a while back, but I haven't heard from her since.

Order of the Bookmark

As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  13:45:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We don't have Trader Joes, but my aunt loved the one in Florida when she lived there.

Pesky, you're getting me hungry for fresh corn. Mid-summer to fall the local farmers markets are always full. Corn is sold by the dozen along roadsides and you learn which farmers pick fresh daily and which don't. My mom's uncle used to have a farm and she'd tell him she'd want a dozen ears and he'd go out and pick it about an hour before she picked it up. That's fresh. My dad is already starting his garden planning...peas and potatoes are the early ones and then cucumbers, zucchini, peppers, and a bunch of variety of tomatoes. I got him a Burpee seed catalog and you'd have thought he was in heaven. He keeps pouring over it and making out his list. When I was little my mom used to do a good bit of canning and we'd have home grown veggies long into winter.

Pesky elaborated on apples. I love a good tart apple and never buy the pretty red ones. You really have to know the purpose for what you're going to use it for. Am I making apple pie, sauce, butter, or just eating? Stay away from anything beautiful. Right now, I'm searching the internet for russet apple plantings for my dad because those are his favorite. They're hard to find and he wants to plant a few. I have no idea what kind of apples I have my yard, but I use them.

Turkey dinner...my mouth is watering as I type.



Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  14:10:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Also, keep in mind that regions vary - we get good beer and excellent cheese but we're foodies around here. My local stores have micro-brewed everything and artisanal cheeses. I wouldn't say we rival Irish beer and no butter can rival that made with Irish milk, but we do pretty well.

Ditto on produce - you need to know what to buy. I also only buy local apples, we get wonderful mountain-grown Fujis - they're better than any apples I've had anywhere else. I haven't voluntarily eaten a red delicious apple since I was.. maybe 8?


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Eeyore
Barmy

USA
311 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  14:51:12  Show Profile  Send Eeyore a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Yay, Trader Joe's! We've had one in my town for a long time, but I didn't really start shopping there until Laura and Tim started working at one in another town nearby. I love that store.

And yes, they have a lot of good tea. Not to mention all the other good things they have. Especially the tripple ginger cookies--yum. And you can actually get some good truffles there, without paying a fortune.

Eeyore

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Member of HPEW & HPCS appreciation Society
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  16:16:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I live in the town of origin for Traders Joes so I have.. 5 within a 3 mile radius. Life is good.

Bee! I was getting some chicken marinating and it hit me - you MUST try Bar-B-Que while you're here! Barbeque is a totally American taste - it's just meat marinated and or basted with a pungent sauce and cooked over an open fire, but when it's good, it's great. You have to try the good stuff, where they use wood-fires and really get the flavor into the meat, not a chain restaurant that throws gloppy sauce on top of parboiled ribs. I'll look for a really good bbq joint, certainly if you head more towards DC you'll get more Southern "q" but there must be good BBQ in New York. BBQ comes in regional specialities - there's Texas, which is smokier and S. Carolina, which is more acidic. Anyway, it's a American tradition and no matter which you try if you get the good stuff, you'll love it.

I'm using Trader Joes BBQ sauce to make BBQ chicken tonight - weather's turned warm so it feels like summer already!


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Siobhan
Chief Healer

USA
2157 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  17:18:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We don't have a Trader Joe's market, but we do have a Whole Foods and a regional market called Earth Fare. Our Trader Joe's is second hand and lower quality home furnishings. I love to shop at Whole Foods. Earth Fare is a close second.

pooo pooo pooo pooo !!!!!

Deliberatley causing mayhem in Snape's Potions class.
Member of the HPEW & HPCS Appreciation Society
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  17:37:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I looked it up, there is a Trader Joe's in the city of Pittsburgh. It's the only one in the region. It's in a section of town that I won't go to. You'd have to go to Ohio to the next closest. There is also a Whole Foods, but only in the city. Nothing in the suburbs.

Biscuits! Bee must try some biscuits while she's here. Not those yucky refrigerator things, but fluffy buttermilk biscuits. I had Creamed Chicken and Biscuit for dinner so that's what made me think of it. You can eat them with gravy, honey, jelly, or just buttered. Very versatile food.

A tip to finding a good barbeque place. If there is smoke coming out the back of the building then it's real. If it advertises as barbeque and it's neat and no smoke is to be seen, then avoid it.

Do they have Kraft Macaroni and Cheese in Ireland? If not, then Bee has to try this interesting artificial food. It's a staple in American households and loved by millions.

Ohhh! Can't forget the . It's truly disgusting but sometimes you just get hungry for it.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 03/11/2007 18:03:28
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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  17:58:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've had macaroni and cheese once before, but I think it was homemade. I'll give the Kraft stuff a go! The idea of a proper American barbeque sounds good too. I'm also intrigued by the idea of savoury biscuits...

With all this eating I'll be doing, it'll be a wonder if I get around to visiting anywhere.

Order of the Bookmark
Purveyor of Fine Peebles
Haggy is (probably not) Cactus!
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  18:06:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh, and please don't watch Jerry Springer, Maury Povich, or any of those small claims court shows. I don't want to even think about what people think of Americans from watching these shows.


Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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Starling
Confunded

United Kingdom
701 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  18:14:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They sell Kraft Mac and Cheese in Selfridges, it's dried and comes in a packet. Does it actually have cheese in it?

I'm so looking forward to the food in Maine, I loooove seafood.

I wuv multicoloured werewolf puppies.
"When Mister Safety Catch Is Not On, Mister Crossbow Is Not Your Friend."
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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2007 :  19:11:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Starling

They sell Kraft Mac and Cheese in Selfridges, it's dried and comes in a packet. Does it actually have cheese in it?


According to the package:

Cheese Sauce Mix: Whey, Milkfat, Milk Protein Concentrate, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Tripolyphosphate. Less than 2% of Citric Acid, Sodium Phosphate, Lactic Acid, Milk, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, Enzymes, Cheese Culture.

We have six boxes in the pantry. (!!!!)


Edited by - n/a on 03/11/2007 19:14:56
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