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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/03/2006 :  19:51:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a few faithful cookbooks. One is an old book from the from the 20s that my gram used when she first got married. My sister has the original and I have a reprint. Then I have two of my mom's, a Better Homes and Gardens one and one called America Cooks, filled mostly with Pennsylvania Dutch recipes. The BH&G one is hilarious to read for the housekeeping tips straight out of the 50s/60s for the "Leave it to Beaver" type housewife, but the recipes are excellent and there are great pictures to help you. Both are filled in the margins and blank pages with family recipes. Other than that I'll look up recipes on the Internet. I had to throw away a huge crate full of cookbooks that my dad had bought through the years. For some reason he had to buy one everywhere he went on vacation. I hate, though, when you can't find a family recipe. My sister and I were trying to remember how to make my mom's homemade baked beans recently and we knew the ingredients but not the proportions. She made them, but they just didn't takes like my mom's. Maybe someday we'll find it, though it probably wasn't even written down.

Diri, did you live near the Amish when you lived in PA? Most of the Amish in Southwestern PA are north of Pittsburgh, but we have some nearby in West Virginia and Maryland. The majority of Amish in the state are located Central PA, where the shooting took place. But they're common enough that you wouldn't think it odd to see a horse and buggy traveling the two-lane highway.

It's just unfathomable to imagine this happening. I heard this morning that since August there have been 24 school shootings in the U.S. with 7 of the incidents being fatal. I never thought of violence when I went to school. It's shocking how much our school systems have changed since I was a public school student. We'd have maybe 3 major fights the whole year when I was in high school, and most of the time it was girls fighting. The schools I sub in now have a police officer on the grounds (common now for most schools) and all the doors are locked to outsiders. The school I'm planning on subbing for in the next month doesn't even allow olunteers into the classroom unless you have your state police and child abuse clearances. They're very strict, which is essential in today's world.


Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 10/03/2006 20:05:45
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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2006 :  03:38:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Diri, did you live near the Amish when you lived in PA?


Not near, but close enough for the occasional trip over. I never got the impression that they were particularly happy to have us gawking at them, but they ran a very nice operation for tourists that gave a great intro into their culture and lifestyle. It's been a while, but I do remember that the word "nine" is the same in English and Pennsylvania Dutch.

Order of the Bookmark

As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2006 :  17:27:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There isn't too much touristy stuff with the Amish in the Western part of the state. We have a larger number of Mennonites (sort of like the Amish but not as restricted).


I've spent a significant portion of the last two weeks in Kindergarten. They are the hardest working teachers in any grade. The group of kids I had were challenging. There were quite a few emotional disorder and/or ADHD students in the class. One boy said, "I hate school. I'm not coming back." I feel sorry because he's only had a month of Kindergarten and he already has a negative opinion of school. He's got a long 13 years of schooling ahead of him. I'm surprised at the lack of socialization skills. Even the ones who attended preschool are having problems socializing. Also what's amazing is that they have homework almost every night--in Kindergarten! I never had homework until 3rd or 4th grade. Times have certainly changed.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 10/04/2006 17:31:21
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2006 :  17:54:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jo... maybe the reason he hates school is because they're asking kids to do inappropriate amounts of work for their age. Nightly homework in Kindergarten is NUTS. I know, my daughter went to a K class last year where she had nightly homework and she felt completely overwhelmed. This year she's in 1st grade, she gets a homework "packet" on Mondays with 2 worksheets that are due Friday. It's a completely positive experience and she's learning. She LOVES school.



And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.


Edited by - AMC on 10/04/2006 17:54:53
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2006 :  19:10:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
AMC, it's great that your daughter is enjoying 1st grade. It is often a very difficult year for students. There is a major transition from K to 1st. Other diffcult transitional periods are 3rd, 6th, and 10th.

The little boy I mentioned is oppositionally defiant. Next year he will be in the Emotional Support classroom. They push so much on these kids, but I've also noticed that most of the children are not prepared for Kindergarten. A majority of the class do not know their alphabet and have little phonemic awareness. As for homework, I've seen some schools moving toward weekly homework packets that they give out on Monday and due on Friday. Some teachers really like them. The problem comes with some school administration. Many schools now mandate a set amount of time for homework per night and won't permit teachers to utlize weekly homework.

Right now I think I would like to be a Technology specialist for Elementary/Middle School. I like having the variety of kids compared to a self-contained classroom. Many districts do not have this position, but some are starting to incorporate it into the curriculum. You teach basic typing, work processing, etc. at the lower level. Districts are beginning to require computer proficiency at the Elementary level, so they're beginning to add it to specialist classes like library, music, and art.

Okay, I've probably bored everyone to pieces about schooling. Hmm...what else to discuss. We're having thunderstorms. I love when it storms. There is just an unusual feeling in the air when a good storm is brewing. Must be the electricity.


Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2006 :  21:10:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well you know I'm never bored with it! You, me & Crispy kept a education thread humming on the Yo-yos. I get so worked up over schooling - it seems to me we go about things all wrong, setting up kids to fail from day (Year) 1. We have such abysmal records of graduating functionally illiterate kids because they fell behind earlier and no one has time to "catch them up" but now to compound the problem they raise the bar in the lower grades so they can fall behind faster! It's crazy - High School graduate should be able to READ! Elementary school graduates should be able to READ. And do Math. And know where their state is and some history and... sigh, everything else. Test scores be damned, I say let's educate people.

Yes, it's great - she's loving it. Part of it was last year the curriculum was SO wrong-headed (homework, penmanship and spelling tests... in Kindergarten) but it was her bilingual pre-school/K and my spouse was determined she stay in bilingual school until she had learned both alphabets.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.


Edited by - AMC on 10/04/2006 21:10:42
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2006 :  23:18:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We're testing our kids to the brink. And I've heard that the current administration, as part of NCLB, wants to start testing students in the federally funded Headstart program (ages 3-5). How and why would you do this?

One nice thing about the school I sub for is that they encourage parents to hold back their children another year if they have not grasped necessary concepts. Many just need another year to mature. Their motor skills are often not yet developed and need that extra time. Kindergarten and 1st grade are the perfect years for retention. Anything later often is too late. The bad thing is that Kindergarten is not required in PA so a school cannot retain a student without parental consent. They are automatically passed to 1st grade. A lot of parents are adamently opposed to any form of retention.

Sadly, I'm excited the the Sesame Workshop is finally releasing a DVD of old episodes of Sesame Street. This month they're releasing episodes from 1969-1974, plus additional footage. In the late 90s, Sesame Workshop retooled the show to increase ratings and it is really no longer the show many of us grew up with. Coincidentally, this also occurred the same time Jim Henson passed away.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 10/04/2006 23:23:17
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Siobhan
Chief Healer

USA
2157 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2006 :  10:44:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh, I'm so gald to hear that someone else thinks Sesame Street has lost some of its luster! It seems they are more interested in emotional and social issues than in education these days.

I remember when I was in third grade asking to finish my school work at home so that I could have homework like my neighbor girl (who was 10 years older than me). My teacher asked my mother whether I was having difficulty finishing my work in class. She thought it was a problem. Daughter has homework all the time.

It is official, Daughter tests for her purple belt in three weeks. She is so thrilled. Nervousness has not set in yet, but it will.

Deliberatley causing mayhem in Snape's Potions class.
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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2006 :  14:41:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Someone at my work shared this recipe today:

Crock Pot Apple Butter

Apples -- cut up to fill 3 1/2 quart crock pot
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup apple cider
Juice of 1 lemon
1 Tbsp. cinnamon

- Place apples in crock pot then add the sugar, cider, and lemon juice. Cover and cook on low for 8 hours. Stir.
- Add cinnamon and cook another 10 hours.
- Stir occasionally until brown.
- Run through food mill to strain out seeds and skins, or use a blender. If not thick enough, return to crock pot and cook on high until desired consistency.


I might try it. I imagine it makes the house smell divine for days.
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2006 :  15:35:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pesky, that's really similar to my recipe, except I don't lemon juice, but I bet it would be good added. If you peel and core your apples first there is no need to run them through a food mill. They'll cook up to the desired consistency on their own. Sometimes I give them a few bursts with the hand blender(those stick blenders you hold in your hand), but it's not necessary.


Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2006 :  15:59:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just found a Flat Earth forum. I don't know whether to join up or not. I think I'd just end up banging my head against a wall.

Order of the Bookmark

As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory
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Myf
Confunded

571 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2006 :  17:27:42  Show Profile  Visit Myf's Homepage  Click to see Myf's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Don't do it, Diri!

I remember asking for homework when I was about 7. A nerd even then.

Yay for Friday. 1 more day of yawn-inducing work and then a bit of fun. Haven't seen the Boy apart from a 15-minute coffee since Sunday. Not cool.

Today is official Walk To Work day, apparently, so I had better get going so I can do so. Wednesday was official Ride of Work day. Do you have those sorts of things?

If you're looking for trouble you found it.
Professor Stephen Hawking
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2006 :  19:01:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not really - take public transit to work or carpool day is as close as we get. Most people live 20-30 miles from their workplaces and some 50+ miles so.. walking to work really wouldn't be an option.

I thought Flat Earth folks were supposed to be fun.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Eeyore
Barmy

USA
311 Posts

Posted - 10/06/2006 :  01:51:45  Show Profile  Send Eeyore a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
They sound a bit odd to me, but I haven't really checked it out.

Great thoughts on education--too bad none of the states listen to any of us. They keep trying to fix it, but they're going about it all wrong. Mainly, they are forgetting the nature of a child, in the "no child left behind", so instead of leaving children behind, many of those children are just going to drop out as soon as they get old enough. Very sad, when kids graduate from high school and have to spend their first year of college doing the English and math they should have had in high school. Oh, and what were they doing? Taking tests, working on group projects, giving presentations,..... I'm so glad my girls are out.

Jo, kindergartners are so cute, but I think that would be the hardest grade to teach. Even the ones who have gone to pre-school sometimes have a hard time with being at school every day. And the transition to first grade--being there all day and eating lunch at school, whether it's a school lunch or one from home, can be very difficult. My first year of teaching was in a first grade class. The other first grade teacher and I were both new and we each had over 30 students. Lots of tears from some of the kids--and from me when I went home at night.

Luckily, the school board was smart enough to realize class size was a problem and set about hiring a third teacher right away. The only place to put her was in a small area of the library with movable chalk boards and book shelves for partitions. So she only had 16 students--we each gave her eight of ours. But having 23 instead of 31 was like night and day. Things got better for all of us except the one boy I had who cried every day for the first 3 months. After visits to the doctor and psychologist, it turns out that Keith's problem was that he'd never spent any time away from his parents and sister. (Kindergarten was OK because he got to go home in time for lunch.) We tried everything, from sending him to the nurse to sending him home to ignoring him (the psychologist's recommendation--hmph!) That was impossible--he wasn't a silent crier--he was a loud sobber who would finally throw up--not fun every day (and he was a big kid, so it was sometimes just hard to be sympathetic about his behavior). Anyway, I finally moved his desk outside the door so the rest of the class could go on sort of normally.

It's very sad, but he did the same thing at the start of 2nd grade and 3rd grade--which at least made me realize that it wasn't my fault. I don't think some parents realize how much they cripple their children by not providing them with some sort of way to interact with other children and with other adults.

And Siobhan, btw--congrats on having such a lovely daughter. She's bright and sweet and very personable--what a delight. Well done.

Eeyore

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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/06/2006 :  10:54:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Eeyore, our Kindergarten goes all day now around here. It's rare that a school has half-day Kindergarten like when I went.

As for NCLB, there are so many things wrong with that legislation. And we can't blame one party over the other. It was a bipartisan written bill. I was watching Oprah a few months ago and she had a program about education. They were talking about how our students aren't competing on a world level because they're built around a 1950s model. A majority of our schools were physicallly built in the 1950s-1960s, and curriculum is still based on those models. They haven't advanced with the times. And we just keep adding to it because we don't know how to restructure or won't.

I've got a goose egg on my forehead. It's more like a robin's egg but it's noticeable and is starting to bruise. I was sitting on the floor in the corner redding up and my cat knocked my small dollhouse on my head. Thank goodness it was the small one and not my massive one that's sitting on the floor. I would have been knocked out cold if that one had gotten me.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 10/06/2006 12:30:59
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dobbygirl
Barmy

USA
300 Posts

Posted - 10/08/2006 :  18:28:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A couple of weeks ago in my Time or Newsweek, they had a huge article about the state of elementry and secondary education in the US....and it's not a pretty picture. They talked about all the things Jo and AMC mentioned: too much testing (and at too young an age), cutting things like recess to get more prep time for tests, too much homework etc. The basic assesment is that we're just setting our kids up for failure and lifetime of hating school. And that puts the US at a definate disadvantage in the world. With all the testing we're squashing the thirst for learning. I tell you, the more I read, the more I think about home schooling my kids (if I ever get around to having them).

Well, I had an interesting drive to work last night. I've been working at the casino for over ten years....I should've known my luck wouldn't last. I finally hit a deer last night. Don't worry I'm fine. I slowed down for the first one, but the second one came out of nowhere and BAM! I hit it in the hind end with the middle of my hood. It went flying off into the ditch. I called 911, but they told me to just stop by the Sheriff's office or a State Police post to fill out a report (since I was fine and the car was driveable). We just don't have the police available to go to every car/deer accident. So tomorrow I get to go fill out a police report, go to my insurance company and then the bocy shop. At least I have the day off.

Mmmmm, baking. I love baking. And I just found two of my grandma's old recipes, I'll have to give the chocolate chip cookie recipe a try. I tried the buttermilk waffles, but they didn't quite turn out. They were good, just not like how I remember them. I think it might have been my cheap waffle maker. And I've been looking for a Belgian waffle maker, but all I can find are cheap two sided ones.

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  00:56:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well dearie, your grandma probably had a very cheap waffle maker - heavy cast iron that needed seasoning every time you cooked on it and never really got "properly" cleaned - yum. Probably made awesome waffles too.

Sorry 'bout the deer and your car - poor things, both of them (and you too!), I'll go join you in a SINUS-y quaff.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Myf
Confunded

571 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  05:21:35  Show Profile  Visit Myf's Homepage  Click to see Myf's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
dobbygirl - what happened to the deer?

I just had a great weekend. Mmm. And this week the weather is going to be fantastic!

If you're looking for trouble you found it.
Professor Stephen Hawking
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Siobhan
Chief Healer

USA
2157 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  11:25:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I began preparing for homeschooling one of the bits of advice I found repeated was "write a philosophy of education document." Sitting down to create a document that puts into words the reasons and goals for homeschooling is a great way to make those reasons concrete in your own mind as well as any school official, family member, or friend.
quote:
3 June 2002

P*** A***
Philosophy of Education

We represent the Individual approach to teaching and learning.

Much is said about the necessity for individual attention in the classroom. Public school educators regularly site large class size and lack of time for individual instruction as a common failing of the public school system across the United States. Indeed, the mass approach currently used is, by necessity, aimed at attaining an “average”. Because time and resources are limited, there is little to offer students who fall at either end of the learning scale. The advanced become bored, which can lead to discipline problems, and they quickly learn that they need do only what is necessary to get by. The student who needs help can be left behind, unable to keep up. P*** A*** finds the mass approach unacceptable; it’s results, abhorrent.

Education is about the student, learning, and producing a love of learning that will last a lifetime. It is about enriching life for the individual and society. It is about opening minds to new concepts and the possibilities of life. It is about fostering imagination and independent thought. The goal of teaching should be to produce thinkers.

As a home school, the goals of P*** A*** are those listed above. We believe there is more to being “educated” than the certificates and diplomas awarded for reaching a series of preset limits. The goal we set for ourselves is to reach beyond those limits, to stretch the mind of the student, and foster the imagination and creativity of the individual.


I am fortunate to have an outgoing and easy going child as a student. She is very attached to us, but functions in unfamiliar settings well, especially when other children are present. Parents often remark on how kind she is to their children, which rather surprised me the first time I heard it. I guess I just didn't consider that kids aren't supposed to be nice or that parents do nothing to encourage kindness or discourage mean behaviour.

Deliberatley causing mayhem in Snape's Potions class.
Member of the HPEW & HPCS Appreciation Society
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  19:03:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a Philosophy of Education laying around somewhere. It centers around the Constructivist approach to education. We more or less had to write it around that approach for college because that was the espoused philosophy. I need to rewrite it to reflect how I really feel. I have more of an eclectic approach. I think direct instruction, behaviorism, and constructivism all have good and bad aspects. I'm more of a mish mash of many things.

We're in mourning in Pittsburgh over the Steelers. A 1-3 season is not good. Even the newscasters didn't want to talk about it this morning. The team just quite playing last night after half-time. I'm glad I didn't watch their downfall.

I have turned my support to baseball and the Detroit Tigers. Half the coaching staff and some of the players are Pittsburghers. You don't know how happy I was to see them defeat the Yankees in the first round of playoffs. The national media said over and over how Detroit, being a smaller market team and not on par with the Yankees, had no chance of winning. on them. The Yankees and Steinbreiner have destroyed baseball, IMO. I'd love to see Leland take the team to to the World Series, and win.

Dobbygirl, I hit a deer last week. Or more like the deer ran into me. I was coming down the hill and suddenly there was a deer running parallel to the car and banged into it. No damage to the car and the deer ran off into the woods. Everyone laughs at me because on the country roads I'll stop completely and honk at them because they are usually in groups of 3 or 4 and run all different directions. That way they scatter before I get to them.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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JKRisSuperior
Mediwizard

USA
694 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  19:53:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm sorry to hear the Steelers are doing poorly, Jo. Maybe they'll improve as the season goes on.
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  20:35:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was cringing last night Jo - things started out so well... sigh.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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dobbygirl
Barmy

USA
300 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  23:11:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Myf

dobbygirl - what happened to the deer?



I have no idea. It went flying off my car and into the ditch. If it hadn't been dark, I might have looked for it. But I was already taking my life into my own hands standing on the side of the road looking for any damage. Plus, the part of the road I was on was the beginning of a hill, so the ditch was extra deep. I asked people who came into work after I did, and they said they didn't see it on the side of the road. It could've ran off and died later.

I spent today arranging to get my car fixed. My insurance company has a list of "approved" body shops that they do business with. Well, the one I want to use isn't on it, so before they approve payment, I have to get an adjuster from the insurance company to look at my car to make sure my body shop is "charging a fair price". I know for a fact that one of their approved body shops overcharges.

quote:
We're in mourning in Pittsburgh over the Steelers. A 1-3 season is not good.


Well, at least they've won A game. My Lions have yet to win anything. Thank god the Tigers are giving Detroit a good name for once. I'm not a big baseball fan, but I'm glad they're doing so good. Plus, the Yankees need to be taken down a peg or two.

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  00:50:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Or three. Or four.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Siobhan
Chief Healer

USA
2157 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  11:47:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hmmmm. Baseball bores me to tears. In fact, most sports do-- even playing them as opposed to watching them.

Jo, I'm not sure what my approach to teaching is aside from whatever works for Daughter is what I do. I sometimes have to get creative in explaining things like math but that's more to do with how our minds work differently. Adding, subtracting and multiplication are no problem. Division is a bear for her just as it was for me. We're working through it. Concrete models work best. Husband asked me if they teach long division in schools anymore. He has clients who swear it is not possible without a calculator and when he works a problem for them on paper, they look at him like he just grew two heads (you should see how they look when he does math in his head!).

Deliberatley causing mayhem in Snape's Potions class.
Member of the HPEW & HPCS Appreciation Society
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  11:52:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, they still teach long division in schools!!! I don't know if they still teach how to manually calculate square roots though - that was my favorite but.. it's tedious, to say the least.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  14:09:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How DO you manually calculate square roots? I've always wondered.

Order of the Bookmark

As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory
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Siobhan
Chief Healer

USA
2157 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  15:18:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AMC

Yes, they still teach long division in schools!!! I don't know if they still teach how to manually calculate square roots though - that was my favorite but.. it's tedious, to say the least.
Well, that was pretty much my answer. But after I thought about it for a minute I wasn't so sure. I told him that regardless of what the public schools are doing, Daughter IS learning long division. We have a friend who tells us that they teach math completely differently than when we were in school. She swears up an down that it works better, but really, as long as you end up with the correct answer (ah, for absolutes!) who cares how you came at the problem. Personally, I don't see enough people proficient in basic math skills like counting back change (without the aid of a calculator or computer cash register) to think that the schools are doing a better job now than when I was growing up.
quote:
And Siobhan, btw--congrats on having such a lovely daughter. She's bright and sweet and very personable--what a delight. Well done.
Thanks, Eeyore! I think she's a keeper, too.

Deliberatley causing mayhem in Snape's Potions class.
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  16:35:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Siobhan, I don't know how different Math is. It's the same as when I was in school. Although they now want you to not only get an answer, they also require you to explain in words how you got it and the method used to achieve your answer. Long division is still taught. They are allowed to use calculators in higher grades, but a majority of Elementary schools I've been in do not allow their use in everyday class.

The more I see of Elementary schools, the more I believe in classes segregated by sex. It's not that I don't think boys and girls should be together. At lunch and recess, yes they should be combined. But they have such different learning styles and maturity levels that I think they both are being shown a disservice.

quote:
Baseball bores me to tears.

That's sacrilege in my family. Baseball is a religion. I'll watch it and enjoy going to the ballpark, but my dad and sister love it. Even my mom was a faithful watcher. I always joke that my dad would love any guy I marry as long as he liked baseball and had a job.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  20:54:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Diri - here's a very boring explanation:

http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/52610.html

Jo, my 5th grade daughter goes to a girls school and couldn't be happier. I think up to about the 2nd grade the boys and girls still play together but at some point it's just teaching two separate sets of kids in the same class.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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