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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2007 :  04:54:27  Show Profile Send diricawl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
One of the major questions about the OotP movie (major for me, anyway) is whether Evanna Lynch will play Luna as British or whether she'll stick with her native Irish brogue. Well this three-second clip

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8KGqo2qzEk

features Luna intoning, "They're called "T'estrals!", thus proving she'll be treating us to a full Irish.

Which is nice.

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"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 05/23/2007 12:34:26

Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2007 :  12:12:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh yeah, I'd actually seen that clip a while ago but forgotten about it. I'm delighted she's been allowed keep her accent. Although, in the clip of filming she appears to have gone all Darby O'Gill. I hope she hasn't succumbed to the temptation to put on a fake Oirish accent a la Colin Farrell. Ah who cares - I still love her. Go Evanna!

diri - your post inspired me to look up the etymology of brogue - it struck me as weird that Irish accents are referred to as shoes, but now I get it thanks to wikipedia - assuming it's telling the truth:

quote:
A brogue is a strong dialectal accent, notably in Irish dialects of the English language. It is from the Irish (Gaeilge) word "brg", meaning "shoe". The term has been said to have been coined by an Englishman who met an Irishman whose accent was so thick that he spoke "as though he had a shoe in his mouth", but it more likely derives from the association of Irish workers with their rawhide shoes.

The term is also used in reference to Scottish, and other Gaelic influenced dialects. The term is sometimes applied to dialects of the Britannic tongues such as Welsh as well.


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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2007 :  12:20:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It doesn't sound any different from her actual accent. Some people in Ireland really do sound like that, you know.

I've always wondered if the term "brogue" was offensive, but I love it so I use it all the time. I especially love to say it with a Scottish accent. It's one of those words, like "dour" that goes better with a guid Scots rumble.

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As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 05/23/2007 12:25:17
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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2007 :  08:26:12  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by diricawl

It doesn't sound any different from her actual accent. Some people in Ireland really do sound like that, you know.



Not in my experience, diri. It can be difficult to discern an exaggerated accent when you're not used to it. I'm sure I can't tell when a British accent is being hammed up, but I've got finely honed paddywhackery detection skills. Evanna's thestral line sounded quite different to her normal accent to my ears.

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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2007 :  10:53:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Maybe it's like in the U.S. Some areas of the South have accents so thick that you can't understand a word they say. They sound fake and that they're putting them on, but they're not. Others just have a soft lilt to their voice. The same goes for Northern accents.

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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2007 :  13:50:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think Evanna's from Dundalk, but she doesn't have a strong regional accent at all. There's a difference between a strong accent that sounds fake and an actual fake accent, because strong accents can often be unintelligible to outsiders whereas the main point of fake accents is that tourists think you're amazing and give you lots of tips (in my personal experience of accent fakery anyway ). I was out last night with a friend from Dublin and we met some people from my home county. She insisted they were putting on fake accents because she couldn't understand a word they were saying, but they really weren't - people just talk like that around here. I had to act as interpreter.

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2007 :  15:21:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I had an Australian friend who would become absolutely infuriated when servers in the US couldn't understand him. We had to interpret for him and it would make him livid. He'd say "I'd like a Coke" but his Coke came out "Cowk" instead of "Coak". The waitresses simply couldn't understand it, he'd repeat it over and over. Finally, one of us would say COKE and they'd get it. Pissed him off every time, he'd say "I SPEAK English" but of course, English comes in lots of flavors.


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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 05/25/2007 :  13:25:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
English comes in lots of flavors.


Most of them wonderful!
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Myf
Confunded

571 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2007 :  07:24:07  Show Profile  Visit Myf's Homepage  Click to see Myf's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bee I've got finely honed paddywhackery detection skills.



Best. Sentence. Ever.

Although I'm the same. I can't think of a single non-Australian who can do an accent that didn't give the person away as a foreigner. Apart from New Zealanders, of course, but then they're just de facto Australians anyway.

AMC, that story sounds like a friend of mine, an Aussie living in Chicago. She used to go into a shop like Starbucks where they took your order, and then your name so they could call you to pick up the order. Anyway, her name is Bronwyn, and they never ever ever understood her so she ended up just calling herself Ann when she bought coffee in the US.

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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2007 :  10:15:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Apart from New Zealanders, of course, but then they're just de facto Australians anyway.


*breathes deeply*

I have a sucession of kiwi au pairs who would skin me alive if I even mentioned you said that. Wherever Archi is, I hope he doesn't see it.

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As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 05/26/2007 10:15:57
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Cour_Delafleur
Confunded

Canada
714 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2007 :  14:47:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some TV shows here use subtitles for Australian accents, which I don't get because I've never had trouble understanding it. I do have trouble understanding some accents from the Southern US, which can make my job a little difficult because a lot of the tourists we get are from the South. The same goes for some of the stronger New York and New Jersey accents. I remember my first summer working there hearing people talk like George's mother from Seinfeld and couldn't believe people actually talked like that. I thought it was something TV shows exaggerated to be funny. But then, most of the tourists were surprised to hear me speak the way I do. I even had someone ask me to put on a Canadian accent (which I assume is something like the accent Bob and Doug McKenzie put on) and I said "this is a Canadian accent". I have never in my life heard anyone say "aboot" seriously. Most people I know say it more like "aboat".

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Myf
Confunded

571 Posts

Posted - 05/26/2007 :  17:59:08  Show Profile  Visit Myf's Homepage  Click to see Myf's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by diricawl

quote:
Apart from New Zealanders, of course, but then they're just de facto Australians anyway.


*breathes deeply*

I have a sucession of kiwi au pairs who would skin me alive if I even mentioned you said that. Wherever Archi is, I hope he doesn't see it.




Diri, both my parents and all of my extended family are kiwis. I think I can mock them gently without being killed. Anyway, any kiwi joke you've ever heard from an Australian has definitely been made about an Australian by a kiwi at some stage.

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gimu
Addled

Ireland
209 Posts

Posted - 05/27/2007 :  17:49:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Evanna Lynch - well I grew up 8 miles from Dundalk and thankfully she hasn't been cursed with a strong Dundalk accent. People with that accent can't say their "th's" at all, so if you listen carefully to the clip you'll hear she has a bit of a problem saying them, and not only with the word Thestral.
I don't like the idea of Luna being played as Irish - sure she is English is she not? Maybe I'm confused...
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 05/27/2007 :  19:47:03  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cour, I've worked with a lot of Canadians (mostly from the West) and there is a very soft but definite vowel difference. I can always tell when someone has the accent and I think "Oh - Canadian" but I don't mention it because I've noticed some Canadians get upset when they're told they speak differently from the locals.

I've also worked with a ton of South Africans and it's very funny to see other people interpret their accents. For some reason people frequently think they're Australian, which upsets them - they like it better when people think they're British. I don't really know why, I'm guessing there's some snob value in sounding British?


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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 05/27/2007 :  22:57:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
AMC, I think it's the diphthongs. Canadians don't say their diphthongs like Americans do. That's why you hear so much of a difference between going "oat and aboat" and "out and about". You also notice it in words like house, which sound like "hoas" to American ears.

None of us believe we have accents. I don't think I have one at all, but I've been told it's very noticable to outsiders. I get pegged right away as someone from Western PA or Eastern Ohio. As for Southerners, I have trouble understanding them if they talk fast. It seems most Southerns talk in slow motion (to a Northerner at least) but sometimes you get a fast talker and can't understand a word.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 05/27/2007 22:58:41
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Cour_Delafleur
Confunded

Canada
714 Posts

Posted - 05/27/2007 :  23:15:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oh Canadians definitely have a different accent than Americans, it's just not, for the most part, as strong as people expect (at least in my experience). And there are also differences between different areas of the country. Where I'm from a lot of people have pretty distinct accents that are very different from the rest of the country. I went to school in Ontario and was told I didn't sound like an East Coaster except for a few words (I said tour like "tore" instead of "toor" and aunt like "aunt" instead of "ant").

Anyway... when I took Drivers Ed a few years ago we had to spend a few days in classrooms watching videos on safety, etc. The narrator had the strangest accent ever. Our instructor asked us to guess where he was from. We came up with a mix between British, Scottish Australian, German, Swedish, South African, American and a few others I can't remember. It really was an odd accent. It turned out he was just British.

"I think she's magic," said Nor.
________"You, you think everything's magic," Manek said. "Stupid girl."
____"Well, everything is," said Nor. - Wicked

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Myf
Confunded

571 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2007 :  04:43:34  Show Profile  Visit Myf's Homepage  Click to see Myf's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
South African accents always masquerade as a weird kiwi accent, to me.

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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2007 :  05:17:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I do see the similarity, but I don't think I could mistake a Sith Ifrican iccent for a kiwi accent.

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As to the avatar, well, if you girls can all have Alan Rickman...

"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 05/28/2007 05:18:42
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Myf
Confunded

571 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2007 :  06:25:28  Show Profile  Visit Myf's Homepage  Click to see Myf's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Well, I suppose I'm basing that on Sith Ifricans who have been living in Oz for a long time. Perhaps SA+Aus=NZ.

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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2007 :  07:11:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gimu

Evanna Lynch - well I grew up 8 miles from Dundalk and thankfully she hasn't been cursed with a strong Dundalk accent. People with that accent can't say their "th's" at all, so if you listen carefully to the clip you'll hear she has a bit of a problem saying them, and not only with the word Thestral.
I don't like the idea of Luna being played as Irish - sure she is English is she not? Maybe I'm confused...



I can't say my th's either, and I'm from the wesht. Well, I can, but I'm in the minority here, and it's only thanks to years of elocution lessons. If I get cross or excited, I lose my them altogether.

The weirdest thing Irish people do - and it's an absolute pain in the arse to transcribe phonetically - is we slightly fricate our "t"s, so that they have a slight "s" quality. Some foreigners find that very confusing, because they hear an "s" sound rather than a "t" sound - I think it depends on what country they're from themselves.

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Cour_Delafleur
Confunded

Canada
714 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2007 :  18:19:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AMC

I can always tell when someone has the accent and I think "Oh - Canadian" but I don't mention it because I've noticed some Canadians get upset when they're told they speak differently from the locals.



It's funny that Canadians hate it when they're told they have an accent, because the surest way to piss off a Canadian is to call them American (it's nothing against Americans, we just don't like when people don't know the difference, even though we know it's hard to tell sometimes).

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____"Well, everything is," said Nor. - Wicked

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dobbygirl
Barmy

USA
300 Posts

Posted - 06/02/2007 :  18:44:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I hate my accent. Everywhere I go (outside the UP/northern WI), people think I'm from Canada! It can be rather annoying trying to explain to people where I live because they think that part of the map is either 1. part of Wisconsin or 2. part of Canada. We do sound similiar to Canadians, but I can tell the difference.

I know exactly how hard it can be to understand a Southern accent. My first boyfriend was from Louisiana and trying understand him was like learning a whole new language.

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Siobhan
Chief Healer

USA
2157 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2007 :  09:27:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I brought Husband to meet my family in Washington (at a group picnic where not everyone was family ), everyone was dissapointed that he didn't have a Southern accent. That's actually one of the things I so love about him. Native Charlestonians (with very bad hearing, apparently-- though we do have quite a few Canadian tourists through Charleston) have asked if we're English or Canadian. There's an question that temps me to say something outrageous-- and sends me into fits of unbecoming snorts.


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Burtnnator07
Addled

72 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2007 :  19:18:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dobbygirl


I know exactly how hard it can be to understand a Southern accent. My first boyfriend was from Louisiana and trying understand him was like learning a whole new language.



Hurray! I just love accents .

dobbygirl: Now, did your boyfriend have had a southern accent or a cajun accent? If he had a Cajun accent, then that is a whole other animal. Cajun accents are a whole new language, especially if they are speaking fast. And my relatives, who are from Michigan, get a little testy with me when I tell them they sound Canadian as well. However, if your WI accent is anything like what I think, then that definitely sounds much different than a Canadian accent to me.

I've lived in Texas my whole life and I think Texans get lumped in with southern accents, but they're different from a "deep south" or "dixie" accent. We have more of a twang, as opposed to a drawl. Even so, none of us think we even have accents until we travel outside of TX.

Australian accents are the hardest to imitate, at least in my experience. The only thing I've picked up on is that 'o's often have an 'r' sound included with them, making "no" sound more like "nor". However, I was recently in Zimbabwe, talking to a Sith Ifrican who asked me to do a british accent, but he told me it sounded more Australian .


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Cour_Delafleur
Confunded

Canada
714 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2007 :  20:55:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Burtnnator07

If he had a Cajun accent, then that is a whole other animal. Cajun accents are a whole new language, especially if they are speaking fast.

I've only spoken with a few Cajuns in my life, but I've had more than my fair share of exposure to Acadians, who are descendents of the same people as the Cajuns (it's been a while since I've studied it but basically they were all exiled by the British from the Atlantic Canadian provinces. The ones who stayed in Louisiana became the Cajuns and the ones who came back here stayed Acadians). Honestly, you don't know what language they're speaking. They call it "chiac" and is basically a mix of Frenglish and their own slang, spoken really fast. A friend of mine from high school was Acadian and says stuff like "oh man, j'ai thought j'ai parker le car just la" or "j'etait, like, ten pieds de le thing". Quebec French sounds amazing compared to "chiac".

"I think she's magic," said Nor.
________"You, you think everything's magic," Manek said. "Stupid girl."
____"Well, everything is," said Nor. - Wicked

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Myf
Confunded

571 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2007 :  23:41:06  Show Profile  Visit Myf's Homepage  Click to see Myf's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Chiac sounds fantastic. I spoke a lot of Franglais with Australian friends when I was living in France. Such fun.

Australian accents = completely bizarre. When mocking the worst of our accent, friends and I try to see how many vowels you can get in the word 'no'. The answer - oh, about 10. Naouaiouuu. OK, then maybe 9. It starts off with a deep round ao sound, then progresses until you get to a real closed u sound, like the French 'u'. But yeah, the wrong pronunciation of 'no' is a dead giveaway of someone trying to do an Australian accent.

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msulizzy11
Addled

USA
55 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2007 :  10:11:20  Show Profile  Click to see msulizzy11's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
I know this thread is a bit old, but I'm reviving it!

As a girl from the Mid-Western US, I truly have the non-accent accent. (All national television presenters in the US aim for the Mid-Western Non-Accent.) So having traveled and lived with people from all over the world (and being completely impressionable) I started falling into the habit of picking up certain accented words. I felt very self conscious about using them but now I mostly just go for it the person either thinks Im being funny or its just how I speak. Which is fine. Sometimes I have an internal battle about which voice to use and it comes out all muddled and I end up stuttering.

What I find really amusing is that I tend to think in a British accent (actually an amalgamation of several) or in French.

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diricawl
Looney

United Kingdom
1078 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2007 :  06:28:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wish I could think in other languages. I have something of a non-accent as well, since I'm not really from anywhere in particular. My mother's Californian, and so I do have a slight tendency to inflect my vowels with the "Yeah, whatevaaar," drawl, but other than that my accent is fairly neutral. I'm aiming for mid-Atlantic, but it's just not sticking.

Those of you who've met me, do you think I sound like a British American, or an American Brit? My American family tell me I have a British accent, but I still sound American to me.

quote:
Originally posted by Myf

Australian accents = completely bizarre. When mocking the worst of our accent, friends and I try to see how many vowels you can get in the word 'no'. The answer - oh, about 10. Naouaiouuu.



Hey Myf, you ever read "Let Stalk Strine"? I don't think I've ever laughed more at a book about ethnic stereotypes (Well, "How to be an Alien" comes close)

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"They don't want the Easter Bunny's power; The children in our generation want Harry's power, and they're getting it." - Laura Mallory

Edited by - diricawl on 08/18/2007 07:20:21
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Jokelly
Barking

USA
1509 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2007 :  13:46:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I used to take German, I found it much easier to think in German. Plus, it helped that I had family at home who spoke a little.

I still don't hear my accent usually, but I've been told it's there. What's neat is that even though we're all one state, Philadelphians and Pittsburgers do not have a similar accents. Philadephia takes more after New York or northeastern accent and Pittsburgh has more midwestern influence. We also have a good bit of Scot-Irish, German, and Eastern European incorporated into it.

I've been getting ribbed in my family lately for enunciating my t's in words. I think it's come from studying phonetic awareness in college. This area traditionally has a dislike of t's and d's in words and just eliminate them. The word internet would be pronounced innernet (with a slightly silent t on the end almost like -eh). There are also grammatical differences. For example, I would say "the car needs washed" or "the table needs cleared" and not think anything of it. The correct way to say it is "the car needs washing" or "the table needs clearing" or to add "to be" between need and your verb. So even if we are able to change our pronunciations and inflections, southwestern Pennsylvanians still usually give themselves away eventually. It's a dialect that is impossible to shake.

Current location: Laying low at Lupin's

Edited by - Jokelly on 08/18/2007 13:51:36
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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 08/20/2007 :  00:39:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by diricawl



Those of you who've met me, do you think I sound like a British American, or an American Brit? My American family tell me I have a British accent, but I still sound American to me.



I would say you sound more American than British to me.

Americans keep getting confused and/or laughing at me because they think I can't pronounce my T's. They sound like S's to their ears. I've tried to point out that it's an Irish thing, and that I do not have an articulation problem thankyouverymuch (it's not really a good thing for a speech therapist to have articulatory difficulties), but they still think it's weird. I've taken to putting on a phony American accent whenever I order water in a restaurant so that the waiters don't give me funny looks and ask me what "waser" is.

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