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Starling
Confunded

United Kingdom
701 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2006 :  08:34:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Girls wear knickers, boys wear underpants!

What do Americans call knickers?

I wuv multicoloured werewolf puppies.
"When Mister Safety Catch Is Not On, Mister Crossbow Is Not Your Friend."
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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2006 :  14:33:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Panties, I think.

Americans think knickers are those golf pants that fasten at the knee and are sometimes worn with argyle socks. Knickers are particularly obnoxious when made out of plaid and worn with a matching hat:


I'd like to see Snape wear that!

Edited by - n/a on 11/09/2006 14:34:43
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Starling
Confunded

United Kingdom
701 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2006 :  16:09:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah, knickerbockers!

I wuv multicoloured werewolf puppies.
"When Mister Safety Catch Is Not On, Mister Crossbow Is Not Your Friend."
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2006 :  18:17:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Both sexes wear underpants or underwear in the U.S.

Boys underwear can be called Jockeys or briefs or shorts.
Girls underwear is frequently referred to as panties.

When I hear "knickers" I think of long, old-fashioned, non-knit women's underwear - think pantaloons without the frills. Snape would look lovely in grey knickers - I think that's how I've always seen him.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Starling
Confunded

United Kingdom
701 Posts

Posted - 11/10/2006 :  06:16:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

I wuv multicoloured werewolf puppies.
"When Mister Safety Catch Is Not On, Mister Crossbow Is Not Your Friend."
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 11/17/2006 :  23:04:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To which I can only reply...


Thanks for the smilie, Starling -


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2006 :  10:20:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lest anyone should forget -- SNAPE IS A NASTY, UNDERHANDED SLIMEBALL!

Hot toddy, anyone?
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2006 :  18:47:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Please! Don't spare the rum on mine - I'm not driving.

*plops into a squashy chair*

Anyone have any wild theories to discuss? I'm temporarily theoried-out but happy to begin again.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2006 :  18:48:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Can you beleive this topic has more replies than Stephen Fry? *faints*


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2006 :  13:11:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't have any theories, but I could use a drink. Or two. Or three or four or five. I've been put through the mill the past two weeks -- Between work and holidays and sick family memebers, I feel like kind of like this guy:

So please let me crawl into this hole and hide for a while. Just put some firewhiskey in my tea ... on second thought, hold the tea, just give me the whiskey. *sigh*
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2006 :  14:39:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There, there - have a seat by the fire.

*Pours Pixie a nice tall firewhiskey, adds a cup of tea as a chaser*

I'll join you in the tea, the sun is still below the yard-arm here. My shoulder is aching though - maybe I should have some of that whiskey for medicinal purposes.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2006 :  15:39:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
*Comes in Humming*

Deck the Halls with Deathly Hallows,
Falalalala lalalala!
Tis the season to Marsh mallows,
Falalalala lalalala!
JKR has fan sites hopping
Falalala lalala lalala.
Much more fun than Christmas shopping
Falalalala lalalala!


We almost forgot to have a S.I.N.U.S Christmas party!

*Pours a round of some rum-punch type drink that steams and changes color every few seconds*

To all those stalwart HP fans who have refrained from Snape-loving foolishness this year! I drink to you! *does so*

Oh what the heck, I'll drink to the Snape-fans as well - it's Christmas!

To Everyone!


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2006 :  19:25:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
*raises glass*

To Everyone! Merry Christmas!

(Now can we talk about how Snape resembles Heathciff in Wuthering Heights?)
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2006 :  22:18:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oooo! Do you really think so?

Let's see:

Orphan-- no, but that's incidental.
Dysfunctional childhood - check.
Incredibly rude to everyone for no apparently reason - check.
Life blighted by childhood love turned into frustrated adult passion... check? I think Snape's life was blighted earlier.
Abuses children - check? Although Heathcliff's are more crimes of neglect, rather than aggression.

Married his rival's younger sister out of spite... not as far as we know..
Forced his love's daughter to marry his own son as some kind of twisted revenge on her father... again not likely.
Died and wandered the earth as a ghost, in the company of his lost love.. well, really not likely unless it's someone other than Lily.

Not too convincing at first glance but you never know - where do you see the strongest resemblance? I've always loved Heathcliff.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  07:44:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I. HATE. Heathcliff. Grr. He makes me crosser than Snape ever has.

Order of the Bookmark
Purveyor of Fine Peebles
Haggy is (probably not) Cactus!
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  15:27:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Goodness Bee, why? Now Jane Eyre drives me nuts with her piety and all of Anne Bronte's heroines set my teeth on edge but I rather like the Bronte heroes - and Heathcliff is my personal favorite.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  17:29:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AMC


Married his rival's younger sister out of spite... not as far as we know..
Forced his love's daughter to marry his own son as some kind of twisted revenge on her father... again not likely.



This kind of marriage drama was a common device in the novels of that era. The marriage itself is not necessarily the important aspect, rather, it is a vehicle for demonstrating the calculating, vindictive, and uncompassionate nature of the character, in this case Heathcliff. Heathcliff would go to any lengths to settle his old grudges, including manipulating and hurting innocent children, even taking pleasure in it.

Heathcliff's crimes against those children were definitely aggressive ... he purposely kept young Hareton Earnshaw ignorant and uncultured while knowing that the boy was intelligent and capable of great things. He purposely took guardianship of his own son so that he could bully him into marrying young Catherine, mistreat him to death, then usurp both their property. He boasted that was his plan from the start.

In this respect, I think Snape and Heathcliff are alike in that they hold onto their grudges and are willing to execute long, deceitful schemes to get what they want.

I also think they may be alike in their relationships with their mentors. The elder Mr. Earnshaw took the young outcast Heathcliff under his wing and gave him his love and his trust, all despite the warnings and protests of others. In the same vein, Dumbledore took Snape in and trusted him when no one else would. Heathcliff may have been fond of Old Earnshaw, but any fondness or loyalty he felt toward the old man was soon overshadowed by the hatred and anger he felt toward the son who wronged him. What Heathcliff ended up doing to the youger Earnshaws out of his anger would have broken his old benefactor's heart. Whether Snape's inner demons casued him to likewise betray his mentor is yet to be seen, but so far the pattern is similar.

Heathcliff and Snape are both dark, fascinating characters who take on lives of their own. Characters like that have a way of growing until they threaten to take over a story. Heathcliff is the epitome of such a character. He is dark and seductive, and his author embraced him and gave him free rein to work to his own conclusion. Charlotte Bronte wrote this about her sister's creation: "Whether it is right or advisable to create beings like Heathcliff, I do not know; I scarcely think it is. But this I know; the writer who possesses the creative gift owns something of which he is not always master -- something that, at times, strangely wills and works for itself."

So far in the HP canon, the dark character of Snape has grown only marginally out of the control of the writer. Whether she can ultimately contain him within the larger story remains to be seen, but I think she can. In fanon, however, Snape runs amok. There he can take his free rein and run with it, without detriment to canon. Personally, I think that's the best place for him and hope it's where he stays for the most part, but you never know.

I do love Heathcliff as a character, just as I love Snape as a character. But as people I can't stand either of them.

edoted because I cant type

Edited by - n/a on 12/23/2006 20:53:12
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U-No-Poo
Addled

133 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2006 :  18:00:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AMC

Deck the Halls with Deathly Hallows,
Falalalala lalalala!
Tis the season to Marsh mallows,
Falalalala lalalala!
JKR has fan sites hopping
Falalala lalala lalala.
Much more fun than Christmas shopping
Falalalala lalalala!




That's a very catchy one, AMC.

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  01:55:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Why Thank you, UNP!

Pixie, excellent points! I particularly love the parallel between their mentors, although I would argue that Snape is hardly Dumbledore's protege, he was one of DD's trusted fellows at the end of DD's life, not someone DD had personally nurtured.

I don't think you'd ever meet a Heathcliff in real life, which is why I feel such affection for him. He's a creature of Emily's fevered brain (and it WAS fevered, in more ways than one). He's a monster and yet such a thorough-going one, that his monstrousness is his charm. He'll destroy everything in sight just because his life own was blighted. I can respect the spirit of that (even if I wouldn't want him as a next-door neighbor).

Perhaps my affection for Heathcliff is rooted in the fact that I could never sympathize with Hareton much, he seemed like a nebbish, whereas with the HP plot, I like and admire Harry (Lupin, Neville et al) so seeing him abused by Snape makes me angry. Not that that excuses the abuse - the act of abuse is as cruel and heartless, regardless of the victim.

In fact, I liked the Snape character much more when he appeared to be a thorough-going villain. There are lots of characters who aren't entirely good or bad (Mungdungus springs to mind) and I'm okay with that but I don't like this wishy-washy he's does terrible things but really he's good at heart. Saying he behaves horribly and then explaining it away as acceptable because he had a bad childhood (for instance) or because he lost his true love is namby-pamby pap. Heathcliff chooses to behave badly. He chooses to alienate himself from everyone, he chooses to abuse and terrorize people. He suffers terribly from his own actions, but that fact that doesn't make him any the more admirable.

I'm liking this more and more.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.


Edited by - AMC on 12/24/2006 03:07:49
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dobbygirl
Barmy

USA
300 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  01:59:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
*sets out plate of homemade cookies*

I do plan on actually baking tonight, so I thought I'd share.


Proud member of SINUS

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  03:08:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yum!!! What kind? Since our House Elf seems to have deserted us, we need to help ourselves. *Pours milk to go with the cookies*


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  10:38:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yumm! Cookies! Thanks! A cold glass of milk too? Wow, this place is fantastic.

Heathcliff is a great anti-hero, isn't he? I love that we can appreciate a truly bad boy around here. Heathcliff was awful to the core, he died unredeemed, and the book was still a classic. Of course, Heathcliff ulitmately died happy because he was united with his true love forever ... yet with his death all the awful things he had done were pretty much reversed: Hareton was restored to his birthright and was fast becoming a young gentleman, young Catherine was restored to her birthright and was going to marry handsome, rich Hareton, and Nelly Dean was happy to see both her young favorites thriving again.

The plotting of that book really is a wonder. It is such a thoroughly unhappy tale full of characters you don't really like as people, yet through twists and turns of fate, justice is done at the end and everyone winds up happy in their own way. All the while, Heathcliff's awfulness is never diluted or spoiled in any way. He is what he is; thank heaven was not turned into a trite pawn in a contrived moral tale.

Maybe that's where I get the idea that a delicious bad boy like Snape doesn't have to turn good or be redeemed in the end for the story to be complete. HP already has plenty of good guys and moral lessons. I'm going to enjoy Snape as a villain as long as I can; he's definitely the best-written, most fascinating bad guy in the books.

Well, I have to go straighen the house and get ready for parties tonight!

Have a Very Merry Christmas everyone!!!! *raises glass of milk*

*sets out alittle gift for Slushy in case she ever returns*

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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  13:02:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hmm - what would Slushy like for Christmas? I think House Elves like to feel useful, how about I give her a really big mess to clean up? *Makes a huge pile of tangled wrapping ribbons in the corner* There. Merry Christmas Slushy, where ever you are!

That's just how I feel Pixie! About both books. It's kind of funny how much more interesting and well-written Snape is than Voldemort who, for all his wickedness, is kind of dull. Voldemort was born bad, grew up bad, lived bad, half-died bad, was ressurected bad. He's just bad. It doesn't even seem like he had a choice to ever be good, although I'm sure he must have. Snape, on the other hand, had options and used them badly. That makes him a better (as in more interesting, not more virtuous) character. As JKR said, Snape has been loved, which in some ways makes him more culpable for his bad choices than Voldy, who never has.

I adore Wuthering Heights because of it's out-there wildness. There's so much to the book - I read it as a girl and loved it but when I read it later for school I was overwhelmed with how much I'd missed as a casual reader.


And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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Bee
Mediwizard

846 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  13:07:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pesky Pixie

The marriage itself is not necessarily the important aspect, rather, it is a vehicle for demonstrating the calculating, vindictive, and uncompassionate nature of the character, in this case Heathcliff. Heathcliff would go to any lengths to settle his old grudges, including manipulating and hurting innocent children, even taking pleasure in it.

Heathcliff's crimes against those children were definitely aggressive ... he purposely kept young Hareton Earnshaw ignorant and uncultured while knowing that the boy was intelligent and capable of great things. He purposely took guardianship of his own son so that he could bully him into marrying young Catherine, mistreat him to death, then usurp both their property. He boasted that was his plan from the start.



Er, that would be why I hate Heathcliff. Thanks Pixie!

I'm not saying he's not a great character - I'm just saying he's vile.

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Purveyor of Fine Peebles
Haggy is (probably not) Cactus!
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Theowyn
Looney

1078 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  13:28:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I swore I would never intrude on S.I.N.U.S. territory again - and you must admit I've been very good - but it IS Christmas and since you guys are talking about WH, I can't resist.

quote:
In fact, I liked the Snape character much more when he appeared to be a thorough-going villain. There are lots of characters who aren't entirely good or bad (Mungdungus springs to mind) and I'm okay with that but I don't like this wishy-washy he's does terrible things but really he's good at heart. Saying he behaves horribly and then explaining it away as acceptable because he had a bad childhood (for instance) or because he lost his true love is namby-pamby pap. Heathcliff chooses to behave badly. He chooses to alienate himself from everyone, he chooses to abuse and terrorize people. He suffers terribly from his own actions, but that fact that doesn't make him any the more admirable.

Admirable, no; sympathetic, yes and actually you're complaints about Snape apply equally - even moreso - to Heathcliff. A lot of people would be startled to hear him called a villain. He is seen by many as the ultimate bad-boy romantic figure: a man consumed with passion for the woman he loves; who is driven to horrible vindictiveness by unrequited love. Poor thing!

And he is ultimately forgiven for all he does by his author. The two lovers are reunited in blissful happiness for eternity. If Heathcliff isn't exactly redeemed, he certainly isn't damned for his sins or called to account for them in any way. In the end, he's rewarded with his heart's desire. He gets the girl and the world is made right again. Hmm... wouldn't be a bad ending for Snape, except for the getting the girl part, of course.

I should say here that I have always hated Heathcliff. Not because of his villainy, but because of the unrequited love that drives the story and which I have never been able to stomach in fiction. Talk about namby-pamby! Maybe I'm just not a romantic, but I have no patience with the likes of Heathcliff, Scarlet O'Hara, and their ilk.

Snape, fortunately, is not driven by unrequited love. Though I'm sure he loved Lily, what seems to drive him is guilt over her death, not pining for her love. I like Snape far better than Heathcliff for this.

While there are definitely similarities between Heathcliff and Snape - most notably the need to punish those they believe are responsible for their miserable lives - the comparison can only go so far because their stories are so different. WH is a dark romance that speaks to the destructive power of love as well as its ability to ultimately save. It's all about Heathcliff; he is both hero and villain and the other characters are just supporting players.

Snape, on the other hand, is part of a much larger landscape in which Harry and LV are the primary hero and villain. Snape can assume the role of hero or villain only as he relates to these other two characters, so the literary dynamics in HP are considerably different.

At a basic level, however, I do think that both Snape and Heathcliff are anti-heros. They are deeply flawed and unlikeable in many ways. But both have captivated the imaginations of their readers and Snape is likely to have as much staying power in the collective consciousness as Heathcliff has - regardless of whether he is ultimately good or evil. These dark, damaged characters do that.

Merry Christmas everyone!


Order of the Bookmark

s.i.n.e. qua non

"Always"

Edited by - Theowyn on 12/24/2006 13:29:14
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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  14:36:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Merry Christmas, Theo!

quote:
Not because of his villainy, but because of the unrequited love that drives the story and which I have never been able to stomach in fiction.


I never got the impression that Heathcliff's love was unrequited. Catherine loved him completely, far more than she loved her husband. She wanted to end up with him, but the mechanations of both her relatives and her own contrary and sometimes mean nature prevented that. Heathcliff was driven by a frustrated desire for the two of them to be together despite their oppressors (as they should have been), not pining away for an unrequited love.

quote:
And he is ultimately forgiven for all he does by his author. The two lovers are reunited in blissful happiness for eternity. If Heathcliff isn't exactly redeemed, he certainly isn't damned for his sins or called to account for them in any way. In the end, he's rewarded with his heart's desire.


But does the author really, truly forgive him? Look at his and Catherine's fate: wandering the moors forever by night, trapped as shades of their former selves. They have been denied the ultimate blissful reward of moving on to the next life. That the author has condemned them to this fate, and has in fact made them happy in it, is more a comment about their characters and what they deserve than it is about her own forgiveness of them. If they are content in such a diminished existence, is she not saying that are they are less pure and deserving than someone who was able to pass on to the next world?

quote:
WH is a dark romance that speaks to the destructive power of love as well as its ability to ultimately save.


With the exception of the romance part, I'd say that statement applies equally well to HP. Dumbledore said that love is a force that is at once more wonderful and terrible than death, human intelligence, and forces of nature. Horace Slughorn said that love potion was one of the most dangerous and powerful potions. because because it produces infatuation or obsessive love, and he expounded that "When you have seen as much of life as I have, you will not underistimate the power of obsessive love." Both acknowledge that "love," as known by humans, comes in more than one form and has more than one side. Jealousy, anger and thirst for revenge are often associated with (impure) obsessive love gone bad, and flawed persons can very easily fall victim to those forces. Therefore, it is entirely appropriate to include an example of the destructive side of obsessive love as well as the positive, healing aspects of pure, unselfish love. To not do so would be simplistic and naive. This is a complexity that has been well-introduced into the series, and I hope to see further explored; given the comments of both Dumbledore and Slughorn, the stage is certainly set for it. Did Snape feel true, pure love or destructive, obsessive love? (Or for that matter, any love at all?) We can make our assumptions and set forth theories, but at this point both options are equally likely and only time will tell.

Edited by - n/a on 12/24/2006 15:14:44
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AMC
Mediwizard

1710 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2006 :  16:12:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think the only people who could view Heathcliff as the ultimate romantic hero are ones who have never read the book - they've only seen the movie. I love Lawrence Olivier as much as the next person, but WH is considerably deeper and weirder than Hollywood can encompass.

Heathcliff could be considered a "romantic" portrait in the sense that romantic means impractical, unrealistic or idealized. Very few people in real life devote their lives or energies so entirely to any single purpose. But he's certainly not romantic in the happily ever after sense. Catherine and Heathcliff - happy ever after? Hardly! Condemned to an eternal half-life together, yes - and that is both their reward and punishment. Wandering the moors as a pair of ghosts is the only fit reward two people who were a miserable pair of humans when they lived, but who loved each other beyond life. That sense of love being powerful beyond everything else fits nicely with HP, as Pixie has said - JKR says love isn't always pretty and it isn't always good, but it is the strongest force we know.

I like your idea that obsessive love will be a part of Book 7 Pixie - given Slughorn's comments, I think you're absolutely on-target. But must it be Snape's? How about Bella? What will happen to her view of her hero, Voldemort, when it is revealed that he is a half-blood? Wouldn't you think that love would be capable of destroying him? Bella is obsessively devoted to Voldemort, she loves him beyond life, family, pride - anything you can name. But she thinks he's a pure-blood and her obsessive love is linked with her lifelong hatred of Muggles and dirty blood wizards. I see her as a great candidate for exhibiting love's terrible power.




And I love you, I love you, I love you.
Like never before, like never before.

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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2006 :  20:59:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I guess it doesn't have to be Snape ... he just came to mind first because he's very dark and destructive himself. I think the interesting thing about obsessive or false love is that the person who feels it doesn't know the difference between it and true, pure love. They believe with their whole hearts that they are in "love" and what they are doing, no matter how horrible, is done in the name of "love."

It's clear to us readers that what Bella feels is not real, pure love, but instead obsession and perhaps even insanity. But is that what it feels like to her? I doubt it. I agree she believes she loves her master. However, her love, like most obsessive love, is false ... it is really just the mirror image of her fear and hatred of muggles and dirty blood wizards. This kind of false "love" is powerful indeed, because it allows the user to rationalize tapping into much darker emotions and powers in the name of "love."

On the other hand, Harry also believes he hates Snape. But does he really, truly hate him? Or is his hatred false as well... a mirror image of the love he feels for his parents and for Dumbledore, combined with anger for what Snape has done to them? There is such a fine line between these emotions, and I think learning where that line is, and how to step to the right side of it will be essential for Harry. He has already faced that test once and succeeded ... with Peter Pettigrew in the Shrieking Shack. Harry despised Peter and had the chance to see him dead, but his love for his parents and his friends, which was his underlying emotion all along, rose up and prevented it. I think the same thing will happen with him and Snape. He'll have the chance to finish Snape, but love for his parents and his mentor will tell him the reasons not to.

Of course, in the end real love will prove more powerful than obsessive love and hatred. But it will be a monumental battle, and I think the players themselves will not always know which power they are using. (For a good example, just look at Barty Crouch Sr.) That's why Harry needs a whole, untarnished soul (which Voldemort, Bella, and even Snape lack). It will help him tap into the true, pure love that exists in his heart, and drive away the hatred and anger with threaten to overcome it. Harry will succeed, and Bella will ultimately fail, and Harry will be more powerful in the end.

Edited by - n/a on 12/26/2006 21:02:00
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n/a
deleted

1483 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2006 :  19:59:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
*wanders in and pours a tall firewhisky*
*plops in squashy chair*
*warms tootsies by the fire*

What a day. I'm so glad holiday week is almost over! At least I don't have to work again until next Tuesday.

Oh ... I remembered another reason Snape reminds me of Heathcliff. Heathcliff also had black eyes that "glittered" when he was up to something.

Ever since you brought up Bella, I can't stop thinking about her role in the books. She's another baddie who's shaping up to be more than meets the eye. She's maniacally devoted to the Dark Lord, yet protective of her family, particularly Narcissa and Draco. She must have been very close with Sirius's family too, since Kreacher is so devoted to her picture. I wonder what part she played in grooming Regulus for the Death Eaters and introducing him into their ranks. I can't help but believe that she was intimately involved in the locket affair ... but I can't work out all the details. Do you think maybe seeing Bella in action, in all her evil and sadistic glory, could have been what turned Regulus against Voldemort? Could Bella have tried to sacrifice him in the service of the Dark Lord?

*hangs Bellatrix pinata from ceiling for New Years Eve Party*

*spins around*

*takes a swing*

Whoops, not even close! This would be so much easier if it wasn't for the firewhisky. But then I guess it wouldn't be nearly as much fun.
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dobbygirl
Barmy

USA
300 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2006 :  21:12:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pesky Pixie
Do you think maybe seeing Bella in action, in all her evil and sadistic glory, could have been what turned Regulus against Voldemort? Could Bella have tried to sacrifice him in the service of the Dark Lord?



Very interesting idea! It could've even been something as simple as Voldemort ordering Bellatrix to torture Regulus. I believe Bella would've done it.

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